Archive for April, 2014

Jeanette MacDonald and Gene Raymond

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 23, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 macdonald1June 18, 1903 – January 14, 1965

Jeanette MacDonald was one of the most popular singer/actresses throughout the golden age of the Hollywood musical. Her legendary professional partnership with Nelson Eddy produced more than 40 memorable films (including Naughty Marietta and Sweethearts) for MGM. Rumors of off-screen romance plagued the duo throughout their lives. After her death from multiple heart ailments at the age of 61, Eddy all but confirmed the rumors were true. MacDonald was a powerful soprano who worked her way out of the Broadway chorus lines to become one of the most successful screen performers of her era. She used her talent and influence to help introduce opera to many who had never heard it before. When not making movies, she toured extensively giving concerts all around the world and was noted for her work with the U.S. Army throughout World War II. In addition to her maybe/maybe not secret affair with Nelson, she was married to…

 

raymond1August 13, 1908 – May 2, 1998

…actor, composer and producer, Gene Raymond. His work throughout the 1930’s and ’40’s saw him star opposite legends like Jean Harlow, Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. He also wrote a number of songs, a couple of which were made famous by his wife, Jeanette MacDonald. In addition to his work in the entertainment industry, Raymond served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. His marriage to MacDonald was rife with controversy. Not only were the two not always faithful, but controversial rumors arose about Gene’s preference for men in his indiscretions. Because of these rumors growing more and more substantial, Raymond sort of unwittingly became one of the original Hollywood icons for the gay community. Despite all that, he remarried another woman after MacDonald died and remained so until his own death from pneumonia at the age of 89.

Burial

Forest Lawn Memorial Park – Glendale, CA

 

Photo - A.J. Marik, Find-a-Grave

Photo – A.J. Marik, Find-a-Grave

Specific Location

Freedom Mausoleum, Sanctuary of Heritage; Enter the mausoleum and take your first right, on the left will be the Sanctuary of Heritage, Gene and Jeanette are on the right-hand side, 4th tier up in the middle, directly below Nat King Cole.

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Jack Buck

Posted in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery with tags , , on April 22, 2014 by Cade

buck1August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002

John Francis “Jack” Buck was a Hall of Fame broadcaster primarily known for his work for the St. Louis Cardinals. In addition to his play-by-play work for St. Louis, he also covered radio for more than a dozen World Series and Superbowl broadcasts as well as other, prominent events. Buck served in the military as a young man where he received a Purple Heart in France during World War II. After the war – and college – Jack began his career as a broadcaster, working alongside fellow legends Harry Caray and Joe Garagiola. He worked his way through the ranks and became the Cardinals’ go-to play-by-play guy in 1969. His career blossomed and he spent the next couple of decades as one of the most revered broadcasters in America. As his health declined (he had a LOT of health issues,) he returned to solely cover Cardinals’ home games as a form of retirement. His last public appearance was shortly after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks when he stated: “I don’t know about you, but as for me, the question has already been answered: Should we be here? Yes!” Jack Buck died the following summer at the age of 77.

Burial

Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery – St. Louis County, MO

Specific Location

Section 85, Grave 117 – Enter the cemetery’s main entrance, go left on Flagstaff Dr. at the first roundabout, at the next roundabout (Circle Dr.) stop on the north side, Jack is buried in the second full row of markers to the west of the top of this loop.

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Max Factor

Posted in Hillside Memorial Park with tags on April 16, 2014 by Cade

factor1September 15, 1872 – August 30, 1938

Little Maksymilian Faktorowicz became interested in cosmetics and hair-styling at a young age. By the time he was 18, he had worked for cosmeticians and wigmakers in Germany and Russia. After a brief (mandatory) stint in the military, Max was named the official cosmetics expert for the Russian royal family. Things we going well, except for the fact that growing anti-Jewish sentiment was starting to rear its head in Eastern Europe. So, he moved to America with his wife and kids and started an empire. An empire made up of make-up (get it?) Factor, as he was now called, moved to Los Angeles and took full advantage of the need for hair and makeup stylings in the motion picture industry. His name and brand would eventually become one of the most recognizable in the entire cosmetics industry. Factor was literally scared to death after an attempt on his life in Paris shook him to the core. He returned home to California after the incident, confined himself to his bed and died. He was 65.

Burial

Hillside Memorial Park – Culver City, CA

Specific Location

Mausoleum, U-112; In an exterior corridor in the back of the Mausoleum, there is a large square of darker marble crypts on the right side just steps into this corridor (not far from Michael Landon) Max’s crypt is located in the middle of this darker square, in the 3rd row up.

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Clara Bow

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 14, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 

bow1July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965

 Hollywood’s first “It Girl,” silent-era starlet Clara Bow was literally the “It” girl. Her turn in the 1927 comedy “It” garnered all sorts of attention and made her a star. In fact, she would go on to appear in more than 50 films (most of which were silent) over her short 12-year career during which she was one of the top box-office draws in the country. Her foray into “talkies” was just as successful. Audiences loved her. Investors loved her. Fellow actor Rex Bell loved her. Bow retired from motion pictures to live out her days with Bell at his Nevada ranch. Her retirement was plagued with psychiatric episodes and the occasional suicide attempt. She returned to Los Angeles and holed up in a Culver City bungalow for the remainder of her years. She died of a heart attack at the age of 60. In the generations to follow, countless young actresses would be called the next “It Girl.” But, none of them ever compared the original.

Burial

Forest Lawn Memorial Park – Glendale, CA

Photo - A.J. Marik, Find-a-Grave

Photo – A.J. Marik, Find-a-Grave

Specific Location

Freedom Mausoleum, Sanctuary of Heritage; Enter the mausoleum and take your first right, on the left will be the Sanctuary of Heritage, Clara and Rex are on the right-hand side, second tier up and 2 spaces into the corridor.

glendale_burnsetal

Aaron Spelling

Posted in Hillside Memorial Park with tags on April 4, 2014 by Cade

spelling1April 22, 1923 – June 23, 2006

The most prolific American television writer/producer ever, Aaron Spelling was directly responsible for hits, both major (Charlie’s Angels, The Mod Squad, Beverly Hills 90210, Melrose Place, The Love Boat, Hart to Hart, Charmed, Starsky & Hutch, The Rookies, 7th Heaven, Fantasy Island, Dynasty) and minor (The Heights, Models Inc., Pacific Palisades, Summerland, Tori Spelling.) His career spanned decades and influenced generations. In the end, Spelling produced more than 200 shows. More than anyone else in the history of television…by a WIDE margin. Despite amassing fame, success and the largest single-family home in all of Los Angeles, Spelling suffered a major stroke at the age of 83 and died a week later. It can be debated what the legacy of the substance of the shows he created might be, but it can’t be debated that the impact they had on popular culture was enormous.

Burial

Hillside Memorial Park – Culver City, CA

Specific Location

Main Mausoleum; Enter the main doors, turn left and then right down a main hall, at the end of the hall turn left toward the exit and the Spelling crypt is on the left.

hillside_spelling

Sharon Tate

Posted in Holy Cross Cemetery with tags on April 3, 2014 by Cade

tate1January 24, 1943 – August 9, 1969

Sharon Tate was a B-Movie actress who was just on the cusp of mainstream stardom when the unthinkable happened…and made her a household name.

Tate’s career as an actress was modest, at best. She had bit parts on television shows like The Beverly Hillbillies and had major roles in cult movies like Valley of the Dolls. But her talents took some work. Being a tall, beautiful head-turner certainly helped cover over many of the confidence issues that plagued her early career. Positive reviews of her comedic performance opposite Dean Martin in 1969’s The Wrecking Crew led to a more confident Tate and her career was finally shaping up. In August of 1969, a very pregnant Tate (she was married to director Roman Polanski) and four others were murdered in the couple’s Benedict Canyon home by members of the infamous “Manson Family.” The grisly crime rightfully shocked the entertainment world and much of the country. The aftermath and trial were a sensation in the media. The killers’ potential paroles would lead to changes in the California Criminal Law to allow victims’ families the right to plea against parolees. Sharon’s mother, Doris, was a leading advocate to this cause and affected significant change for victims’ rights. So, in death, Sharon’s story would go on to help countless others receive the dignity and closure they deserved.

Burial

Holy Cross Cemetery – Culver City, CA

Specific Location

Saint Ann’s Section, L152, 6; To the west of the Grotto section in the triangular Saint Ann’s section, Sharon’s grave is 3 rows down from the Grotto and 5 spaces from the northern edge. Sharon’s mother, Doris, is also now buried here.

grotto_tate

Honoré de Balzac

Posted in Père Lachaise Cemetery with tags , on April 2, 2014 by Cade

balzac1May 20, 1799 – August 18, 1850

A noted pioneer of the Realist movement in European literature, Honoré de Balzac was a highly influential novelist and playwright. Balzac’s work was known for its flawed characters and minute detail that outlined life in his native France (specifically, Paris) in the time after Napoleon. The energy that drove his characters and stories wasn’t just creation. The man, himself, lived life at a torrid pace. Many of his finished novels and plays are the result of meticulous – borderline obsessive – revision and gallons upon gallons of coffee. In the end, he created a body of work that directly inspired titanic writers like Proust, Dickens, Dostoyevsky and Faulkner. Later in life, Balzac married a woman who had written him an anonymous critical letter. He sought her out, began a relationship and the two were eventually married. Five months into the marriage, Balzac died suddenly at the age of 51. His funeral was attended by “every writer in Paris” and he was eulogized by friend and contemporary, Victor Hugo.

Burial

Père Lachaise Cemetery – Paris, FRANCE

Specific Location

Division 48, #1; Along the northwest side of Chemin C. Delavigne.

pere_balzac

Joseph Pulitzer

Posted in Woodlawn Cemetery (NY) with tags on April 1, 2014 by Cade

pulitzer1April 10, 1847 – October 29, 1911

Sporting one of the most famous surnames in American history, Hungarian-born Joseph Pulitzer is best remembered as a newspaper publisher and for the annual prizes that bear his name. He also, briefly. represented the state of New York in the U.S. House of Representatives. The publishing battles between Pulitzer and rival, William Randolph Heart, paved the way for the modern, ad-driven, multi-faceted newspaper industry. He got his start as a penniless vagabond in St. Louis after the American Civil War. By way of a job with a rail company, he began reporting for the Westliche Post. He worked his way up the ranks and eventually bought and sold shares in the paper – making a decent profit. This led to his purchase of the St. Louis Post and St. Louis Dispatch papers. He combined the two and went on to purchase the New York World as well. Pulitzer’s flair for human interest stories and championing of the common man made his papers extremely popular. And, added to his wealth. Multiple health issues eventually forced him to step aside from the day to day of the papers, but he remained a manager from afar. He died aboard his yacht in South Carolina at the age of 64. The money he left to Columbia University funded the Pulitzer Prizes in photography, journalism, literature, poetry, history, drama and music, which are, of course, still given out today.

Burial

Woodlawn Cemetery – Bronx NY

Specific Location

Evergreen Plot; The large, unmistakable Pulitzer family plot is located just north of Central Ave. at the southern end of this section.

woodlawn_pulitzer